FAQ

Mental Health can be a complex and sensitive issue that is fairly stigmatized. At Sati we are trying our best to break the stigma and allow people to be able to express themselves. The best way for us to connect the world together to create an empathetic society is through the use of mobile application.

How to be empathetic listener (4.84 MB, pdf) Download

General

  • Why was Sati App founded?

    Sanju, Sati App Founder, have lived with Major Depressive Disorder and Schizophrenia since 2015. He went through medication, therapy, as well as Electro Convulsive Therapy, however, in 2018, he decided to take his own life. Prior to harming himself, he called up a suicide hotline, but his called went unanswered. When he came out of the hospital, he knew that his call wasn’t the only call that wasn’t being answered and that there needs to be a proper system in place to help those in need of someone to listen to them. This is why, he decided to develop Sati App, a mobile application that will allow users to connect to empathetic listeners in the easiest way possible. Hoping that this will be a safe place that people can share their feelings without the fear of being judged.

  • What is the meaning of Sati?

    Coming from Thailand, a Buddhist majority country, you hear the use of the word “Sati” a lot which is the Buddhist term translated into English as “mindfulness”. To have “Sati” is to be conscious of your present and of your actions not just toward others, but also toward yourself. The reason Sanju have chosen this word as the name of our application is because it is important for us to be mindful of one another. Either if we are the one in trouble or if we know someone who needs help. By being mindful, we will be able to practise empathy which can lead to a kinder society.

  • What does Sati App do?

    Sati App is an “on demand listening” services which allows user to quickly connect to a trained empathetic listener. Understanding that sometime people are just stress, and they need someone to listen to them. Yet it is hard for us to find that safe space without our own community. Sati App aims to train general public on the importance of empathetic listening or listening from the heart. Our Heart With Ears volunteers will then provide the listening service to our users who are looking for some companion during their stressful time. We hope that by doing so, we will be able to raise awareness on Mental Health, Mental Wellbeing, Empathetic Listening and in the end, creating a more compassionate society.

  • Who is listening to me?

    Listeners on Sati App are general public who have signed up to be trained as a listener by the Department of Mental Health and to volunteer their time on Sati App.

  • What is empathetic listening?

    A lot of time, we think that we are a good listener, because we listen to people. However there are a lot of subconscious actions that needs to be taken into account. Most of the time when we listen to someone, we tend to give them advise, try to help find the silver lining, we not completely there, or we are just listening to half of what the other person is saying. Many time we feel sorry for the person and think that sympathy is the same as empathy. However, there is a big difference between Sympathy and Empathy. To sympathise with someone is to feel sorry for them. To empathise with someone is to put yourself in the other person’s situation and understand it from their perspectives. When we are being an empathetic listeners, we do not try to assert our understanding and advise on the other person. We just allow them to express their emotions, and let them know that we are there for them, to support and listen to them. You can download our guide on empathetic listening here.

  • When can I use Sati App?

    Sati App is created as a medium to allow user to connect with empathetic listeners anytime they feel stressed, burnout, lonely, anxious, or overwhelmed. We want the app to be another solution or source for people to reduce the pressure on their mental wellbeing. To talk your stress out can help you see a clearer picture of what you need to do.

  • How to unsubscribe from Sati Mails?

    You can easily go to our monthly mails and click unsubscribe right at the bottom. Do let us know how we can generate content that will be of your interest.

  • How can I contact Sati App?

    For any questions, you can drop us an email at talk@satiapp.co

User

  • What all do I need to register to use the app?

    You can download Sati App via App Store or Play Store. To register, all you need to provide us are Age, Gender & Location Services and agree to our Terms & Conditions.

  • Do I have to pay anything?

    We understand the urgent need for there to be more empathetic listeners in our society, as well as high cost of seeing a psychiatrist, therefore we have dedicated our time and efforts to make this platform free for all. However, should you wish to donate to help us maintain Sati App, you can do so at socialgiver.com

  • Are there any stress test that I can take?

    We are currently developing a stress module that will allow you to quickly take a test online via Sati App and Website.

  • How do I connect with listener?

    To connect to a listener, all you need to do is sign up onto our application, and once you are in, just click the “Talk” button. We are constantly increasing the number of listeners and hopefully the waiting time will be reduced.

  • Are any of my information shared to the listener?

    None of the information you used for signing up will be shared to listeners. We do not recommend you to share any person information to the listener, however that is up to your own judgement.

  • Where can I make a complaint about listener?

    We are constantly looking to make sure our service keeps getting better. However should there be any concerns you want to raise, please drop us an email at talk@satiapp.co with the subject: “Complain on Listener - Call Time - User ID” and provide us with the time the call was made and your unique user ID.

  • My account has been deactivated, help!

    Kindly send us an email to talk@satiapp.co with the subject: “User Deactivated - User ID”

Listener

  • Why should I become an empathetic listener?

    We are seeing a rise in number of people living with anxiety, burnout, chronic stress or some form of Mental Health Disorder. Currently we do not have enough listeners to support the number of cases in Thailand. In 2018 alone, there were over 800,000 calls made to 1323 and only 25% of the calls was answered. This is why we need to create army of Heart With Ears volunteer to create a peer support for those living in the same society. More over, we are moving the a society where we learn how to talk, yet we never learn how to truly listen. The indirect result that we want from creating Sati App is to have more public who understand empathetic listening in our society.

  • How can I sign up as a listener?

    To become a listener, all you need to do is request to download our Listener App on our website. The information that you will need to provide us include, Full Name, Age, Gender and your ID Card No. These information will be provided to Department of Mental Health who will provide the training date for you. Once you received the training date, the Department of Mental Health will have a training session for you and after that you will receive your Unique Listener ID and password as well as a link to download the listener app.

  • Where can I be trained as an empathetic listener?

    The empathetic listening will be carried out by Department of Mental Health once you have signed up and will they provide you with answers for all the questions that you may have.

  • Are there any cost involved?

    No, there are no cost involved in getting the training. Once you have been trained, we will provide you with your Listener ID and password to access the listener app. From then on you will be able to assist us in providing listening services to anyone who is in need.

  • How old must I be, to become a listener?

    We require the age of the listener to be 22 years of age and above.

  • The user I talked to is being inappropriate, what do I do?

    Should there be any concerns you want to raise, please drop us an email at talk@satiapp.co with the subject: “Complain on User - Call Time - Listener ID” and provide us with the time the call was made and your unique Listener ID. Know that we are here to protect your well-being as well.

  • My listener account has been deactivated, help!

    Kindly send us an email to talk@satiapp.co with the subject: “Listener Deactivated - Listener ID”

Contact

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Sati in Seoul, South Korea

Dec 15

We are  pleased to be selected as the participant of the "2019 Startup Hub Korea" program organized by Seoul Global Startup Center, which provides opportunities for overseas startups to accelerate their startups and experience the Korean startup ecosystem. Sati was represented there by Ondřej Nádvorník, Co-founder of Sati on November 2019.

ABOUT THE SEOUL GLOBAL STARTUP CENTER

Founded in 2016 and funded by the Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul Global Startup Center (Seoul GSC) is an organization that supports foreign startups in the city of Seoul.

SGSC IS operated by a consortium of 2 private companies, WeWork Labs Korea & N15 hardware accelerator.

Since launch, They have successfully accelerated and supported a total of 85 unique startups to graduate our program in 3 different cohorts. Their most recent and current cohort has 44 participating startups.

For More info: Website, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Meetup

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Youth Mental Health conference

Nov 15

In April, Sati’s founder, Amornthep S. (Sanju), was nominated as one of the Global Shapers to attend the Youth Mental Health conference by World Economic Forum and Orygen in London,
United Kingdom. The conference invited delegates in the field of Mental Health from all over the world. Here is some of Amornthep’s personal experience:

“I was very excited to have been nominated to join the Youth Mental Health conference in London. It was a sort of invitation which was justifying that my voice as a Mental Health advocate is being heard. I certainly didn’t know what to expect at this 2 day conference and didn’t know if I would be able to share my idea to be heard by others.

When I was there, I was greeted by delegates from Orygen who was kind and were very happy to have me join the conference. That was the first positive sign for me. I slowly creep myself in to a circle of other delegates chatting about their work. There were Psychiatrist, Writers, Counsellors and representatives from various foundations across the globe who are well experienced of the problem with Mental Health. The thought started racing in me, whether or not I was out of my depth, whether I will be heard amongst these scholars or worst, whether I will have the guts to share my idea in front of them. I wanted to make sure that I shine as bright as them.

We were then separated in 7 different groups. At first I was afraid to give any input, when I started, it was amazing how they took in my comments and suggestions. How they positively reacted to what ideas I was bringing to the table. This is because I had something to share with them. The story of how I myself battled with Depression and Schizophrenia. I was able to show different aspects that they may not have thought of before. Moreover, thanks to Orygen, I was given the stage to share my difficult journey with Mental Health and my promise to make my community a more empathetic community and hoping spread the importance of empathy to the rest of the world.

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Why Sati?

Sep 11

Our Founder, Amornthep S. (Sanju) is from Bangkok, Thailand and here is the story behind the name Sati.

“I personally went through Mental Health problems for 4 years now. The problem with Depression and Schizophrenia is that you constantly get anxiety and panic attacks. Whenever I have one of these attacks, I will always call a close friend who will remind me to breath and have “Sati”.

Being in a Buddhist majority country, you hear the use of the word “Sati” a lot which is the Buddhist term translated into English as “mindfulness”. To have “Sati” is to be conscious of your present and of your actions not just toward others, but also toward yourself.

The reason I have chosen this word as the name of our application is because it is important for us to be mindful of one another. Either if we are the one in trouble or if we know someone who needs help. By being mindful, we will be able to practise empathy which can lead to a kinder society.

However, when you are having anxiety attacks, panic attacks or just stressed, we can easily lose our “Sati” or our calmness. That is when we need to practise breathing or have a place where we can talk to someone safe to let out what is stressing us.

Sati is that place for you. A safe space for you to share your feelings. A place for you to gain back your conscious by sharing and caring.”

Sign up to our newsletter to be updated about our upcoming events and application.

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The Diet for Healthy Mental Health

Jul 7

Can you eat your way to better mental health? Study says yes

It is well known that eating lots of fruit and vegetables is good for your physical health, but our latest research suggests that it might be good for your mental health too.

A study from Australia in 2016 found improvements in psychological well-being after increases in fruit and vegetable consumption. We wanted to know if this finding held true using a larger sample (more than 40,000 participants) from the UK Household Longitudinal Study.

Our analysis showed that increases in the consumption of fruit and vegetables are linked to increases in self-reported mental well-being and life satisfaction in data that spans a five-year period, even after accounting for other determinants of mental well-being such as physical health, income and consumption of other foods.

The benefits of physical activity for mental health are well established. The estimates from our work suggest that adding one portion to your diet per day could be as beneficial to mental well-being as going for a walk on an extra seven to eight days a month. One portion is equal to one cup of raw vegetables (the size of a fist), half a cup of cooked vegetables or chopped fruit, or one piece of whole fruit. This result is encouraging as it means that one possible way to improve your mental health could be something as simple as eating an extra piece of fruit every day or having a salad with a meal.

It is important to stress that our findings alone cannot reveal a causal link from fruit and vegetable consumption to increased psychological well-being. And we can't rule out socalled "substitution effects". People can only eat so much in a day, so someone who eats more fruits and vegetables might just have less room in their diet for unhealthy foods. Although we accounted for bread and dairy in our study, ideally, future research should track all other foods consumed to rule out alternative explanations.

But when taken in combination with other studies in this area, the evidence is encouraging. For example, a randomised trial conducted in New Zealand found that various measures of mental well-being, such as motivation and vitality, improved in a treatment group where young adults were asked to eat two extra portions of fruit and vegetables a day for two weeks, although no changes were found for depressive symptoms, anxiety or mood.

Though our own study cannot rule out that people with higher levels of mental well-being might be eating more fruits and vegetables as a result, a recent commentaryon our work by the authors of the 2016 Australian study sheds further light on this. The authors show that the number of fruit and vegetable portions eaten in a day can predict whether someone is diagnosed with depression or anxiety two years later. But the reverse does not seem to be true. Being diagnosed with depression does not appear to be a strong predictor of fruit and vegetable consumption two years later. This suggests that it is perhaps more likely that eating fruits and vegetables is influencing mood and not the other way around.

Source: https://edition.cnn.com/2019/02/18/health/diet-mental-health-partner/index.html

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Amornthep Sachamuneewongse

Founder/CEO

The engine of the SATI APP.

Living with depression and schizophrenia has not been easy.

When I first started complaining about my head to my family in 2015, they took me to the hospital, where a doctor recommended an MRI scan. The MRI came out clear, but my migraines persisted. It was suggested to my parents that I should see a psychiatrist. They said they had never thought about it. They didn’t know where to go, or who would be best.

We chose a well-known hospital in Bangkok, which had a small psychiatric department of just two rooms. I saw a doctor there for a few months, but I never got along with him. I felt that he didn’t understand me, and he told me to do things that didn’t feel like my “natural instinct”, if that makes sense.

As time went by, nobody understood what was going on with me, especially when I started hallucinating. My family thought that I was possessed and the best thing to do was to take me to see a ghost doctor. Not being a believer, that only made matter worse.

In December 2015, without telling my parents, I signed myself into a proper psychiatric hospital. I started seeing a doctor and a counsellor. They understood me more, and for the first time in eight months, I felt like I wasn’t alone. I finally told my parents that I was now visiting a psychiatric hospital.

By the time I saw a proper doctor, my condition had worsened. I was diagnosed with major chronic depression and schizophrenia, because I kept hallucinating. I started receiving diagnoses from December 2015, but by March 2016, my mental health had deteriorated badly. I was self-harming and talking about suicide during my hospital sessions. This prompted the doctor to prescribe me electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). There were only three hospitals in Bangkok, according to the information we had, that delivered ECT. All three were government hospitals.

My ECT treatment started in April 2016. I remember having to leave home at 6am to arrive and wait my turn, which usually came around 10am. I would wake up after my treatment at around 12.30pm, then go home. After receiving ECT 36 times, I was on the road to getting better. However, because of all the medicines I had been taking, I had gained 40kgs by then. This made it too dangerous to continue performing ECT on me. After two years of treatment, I have now gained 65kgs.

With everything that was going on with me, I decided to commit suicide in 2017. Saved by my parents, I was later admitted into the hospital for therapy again. Once I was out, I decided to leave Thailand for a couple of months to take care of myself.

As I was away from the environment I felt toxic to me, I was getting better. After 2.5 months when I came back to Thailand towards the end of 2017, I felt better. However that didn’t lasted long. I started going down the dark path again.

In June 2018, I decided to commit suicide again. However this time I tried calling the suicide hotline before doing on and my call wasn’t answered. In split seconds, I was back in the hospital again.

Once I came out, I was angry that no one answered my call when I needed them. So I tried calling the suicide hotline again and I took me 4 trials (over a period of 4 days) to get in touch with them. They told me the shortage of volunteers that they are facing when compared to the growing number of callers. As a back-up they gave me another number that I can called, which I tried right away and after 5 minutes, no one answered my call.

With all that I went through, understanding the importance of having someone to listen to you in time of need, understanding that being able to talk to someone can be a matter of life or death and understanding the overwhelming number of suicide cases, I decided to use start Sati App, an on-demand listening services.

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Ondřej
Nádvorník, MBA

Co-Founder/CTO

Ondřej is technological expert with more than 10 years of experience.

Ondřej is creative and goal oriented out-of-the-box thinker. He has an entrepreneurial approach to business building and real start-up experience. He is experienced in multi-channel, brand & performance growth hacking and he has proven leadership skills with the ability to build a high performing team.

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Chutipon Watanakemapirut

Design manager

Responsible for SATI Brand

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Rossana Rungnirunpond

Business Development

Helping people solving problems in life.

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Dr. Nattakorn Jampathong, M.D.

Advisor ASIA

Director, Khon Kaen Psychiatric Hospital

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Dr. Varoth Chotpitayasunondh, M.D.

Advisor ASIA

Department of Mental Health, Thailand

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Petr Winkler, Ph.D.

Advisor

National Institute of Mental Health, Czech Republic

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Alexander
Kasal

Advisor EU

Researcher in National Institute of Mental Health, Czech Republic

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Dmytro Turchyn, Ph.D.

Advisor EU

Artificial Intelligence Lead, CEE HQ at Microsoft

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Dr. Naeem Dalal, M.D.

Advisor

Mental Health Expert, Zambia

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Tarin
Yuangtrakul

Visual Designer/Artist

Art Director

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Yeen Chalermvongsenee

Advisor

Marketing Director

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Aliza Napartivaumnuay

Advisor

Co-Founder & Head of Partnerships at Socialgiver

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About

The need for someone to listen to you without judgement is getting increasingly important. Certain things are hard for us to share with people closest to us and for that we continue to carry the burden upon us. Many who cannot handle the stress end up harming themselves.

 

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Facts

Suicide and suicide attempts take a tremendous emotional toll on the families and friends of those who died, as well as on attempt survivors. But suicide also has economic costs for individuals, families, communities, states, and the nation as a whole. These include medical costs for individuals and families, lost income for families, and lost productivity for employers.

The costs of suicidal behaviors—and the savings that can result from preventing these behaviors—can help convince policymakers and other stakeholders that suicide prevention is an investment that will save dollars as well as lives. For example, the recent study Suicide and Suicidal Attempts in the United States: Costs and Policy Implications revealed the following:1

  • The average cost of one suicide was $1,329,553.
  • More than 97 percent of this cost was due to lost productivity. The remaining 3 percent were costs associated with medical treatment.
  • The total cost of suicides and suicide attempts was $93.5 billion.
  • Every $1.00 spent on psychotherapeutic interventions and interventions that strengthened linkages among different care providers saved $2.50 in the cost of suicides.

 

Mean Medical and Work-Loss Costs per Injury Death by Intent – United States, 20132

Mean Medical and Work-Loss Costs per Injury Death by Intent, United States 2013

Mean Medical and Work-Loss Costs per Emergency Department-Treated Nonfatal Injury, by Intent – United States, 20133

Mean Medical and Work-Loss Costs per Case of Emergency Department-Treated Nonfatal Injury, by Intent, United States, 2013

References

  1. Shepard, D. S., Gurewich, D., Lwin, A. K., Reed, G. A., Jr., & Silverman, M. M. (2015). Suicide and suicidal attempts in the United States: Costs and policy implications. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.
  2. Florence, C., Simon, T., Haegerich, T. Luo, F., & Zhou, C. (2015). Estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs of fatal injuries – United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 64(38), 1074–1077. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6438a4.htm
  3. Florence, C., Haegerick, T., Simon, T., Zhou, C, and Luo, F. (2015). Estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs of emergency department-treated nonfatal injuries – United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report,64(38), 1077–1082. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6438a5.htm
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Story behind

Amornthep Sachamuneewongse
Founder, CEO

Living with depression and schizophrenia has not been easy.

When I first started complaining about my head to my family in 2015, they took me to the hospital, where a doctor recommended an MRI scan. The MRI came out clear, but my migraines persisted. It was suggested to my parents that I should see a psychiatrist. They said they had never thought about it. They didn’t know where to go, or who would be best.

We chose a well-known hospital in Bangkok, which had a small psychiatric department of just two rooms. I saw a doctor there for a few months, but I never got along with him. I felt that he didn’t understand me, and he told me to do things that didn’t feel like my “natural instinct”, if that makes sense.

As time went by, nobody understood what was going on with me, especially when I started hallucinating. My family thought that I was possessed and the best thing to do was to take me to see a ghost doctor. Not being a believer, that only made matter worse.

In December 2015, without telling my parents, I signed myself into a proper psychiatric hospital. I started seeing a doctor and a counsellor. They understood me more, and for the first time in eight months, I felt like I wasn’t alone. I finally told my parents that I was now visiting a psychiatric hospital.

By the time I saw a proper doctor, my condition had worsened. I was diagnosed with major chronic depression and schizophrenia, because I kept hallucinating. I started receiving diagnoses from December 2015, but by March 2016, my mental health had deteriorated badly. I was self-harming and talking about suicide during my hospital sessions. This prompted the doctor to prescribe me electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). There were only three hospitals in Bangkok, according to the information we had, that delivered ECT. All three were government hospitals.

My ECT treatment started in April 2016. I remember having to leave home at 6am to arrive and wait my turn, which usually came around 10am. I would wake up after my treatment at around 12.30pm, then go home. After receiving ECT 36 times, I was on the road to getting better. However, because of all the medicines I had been taking, I had gained 40kgs by then. This made it too dangerous to continue performing ECT on me. After two years of treatment, I have now gained 65kgs.

With everything that was going on with me, I decided to commit suicide in 2017. Saved by my parents, I was later admitted into the hospital for therapy again. Once I was out, I decided to leave Thailand for a couple of months to take care of myself.

As I was away from the environment I felt toxic to me, I was getting better. After 2.5 months when I came back to Thailand towards the end of 2017, I felt better. However that didn’t lasted long. I started going down the dark path again.

In June 2018, I decided to commit suicide again. However this time I tried calling the suicide hotline before doing on and my call wasn’t answered. In split seconds, I was back in the hospital again.

Once I came out, I was angry that no one answered my call when I needed them. So I tried calling the suicide hotline again and I took me 4 trials (over a period of 4 days) to get in touch with them. They told me the shortage of volunteers that they are facing when compared to the growing number of callers. As a back-up they gave me another number that I can called, which I tried right away and after 5 minutes, no one answered my call.

With all that I went through, understanding the importance of having someone to listen to you in time of need, understanding that being able to talk to someone can be a matter of life or death and understanding the overwhelming number of suicide cases, I decided to use start Sati App, an on-demand listening services.

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About to be a listener

With easier access to smart phones we’re therefore creating a suicide prevention application. A smart phone app provides. With easier access to smart phones we’re therefore creating a suicide prevention application. A smart phone app which provides With easier access to smart phones we’re therefore creating.

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Become a listener

With easier access to smart phones we’re therefore creating suicide prevention application. A smart phone.

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Be part of Sati

With easier access to smart phones we’re therefore creating suicide prevention application. A smart phone.

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Sati hosts students from BU and UTCC

Ondřej Nádvorník Oct 9

Sati got a chance to host students from BU and UTCC.

To share with them about Sati and discuss about the importance for leaders to have and understand empathy. To have empathy and be vulnerable isn’t a weakness, but once we truly understand that, we will be able to empower others around us to be empathetic as well 💙 Thank you CommonPurpose for making this happen

Na obrázku může být: 17 people, people smiling

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Our CEO selected to go to the Davos 2020

Ondřej Nádvorník Nov 8

The Article from our CEO.

Sanju 'Amorn' Sachamuneewongse:

"This year has been so inspiring! I have never thought I would be able to meet up with so many amazing souls trying to change the world and be a voice for Mental Health. To top it off, I have been selected as 1 of 50 Shapers to go to the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2020 in Davos, Switzerland! 💙

I will make sure to make Global Shapers Bangkok and my Shapers for Mental Health family proud! 😄

Getting nervous and excited at the same time 🤪 Thank you to my family and life saving friends who have stucked with me during my dark years and created a safe space for me 🥰 It is because of you picking up my calls, listening to me, caring for me, and holding me that gave me today". 

Na obrázku může být: 1 person, smiling , text

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Video - The SATI APP story

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Your safe space to share

Smart phone app which provides on-demand listening service to users

Available soon on


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Your safe
space to share

Smart phone app which provides on-demand listening service to users

To understand someone going through mental issue is hard. It takes someone with high empathy to be able to help another person. Our mission is to create an army of empathetic listeners who are available 24 hours for you. An army of people who are ready to listen to you and be a shoulder for you to cry on. We believe that by talking, you will be able to uplift your mood and let go of anything that is holding you back.

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